Agar

Agar is a gelling agent of natural origin extracted from red algae (Gelidium, Gracilaria species).

Agar is a gelling agent of natural origin extracted from red algae (Gelidium, Gracilaria species). It has been used in Japan since the 16th century to make certain traditional pastries such as yokan. It makes it possible to produce firm gels from all types of aqueous liquids.

Properties: gelling agent

RECIPES WITH AGAR

Fluid lime gel

Strawberry pearls

Fresh apple inserts

Trompe l’oeil egg

TECHNICAL SHEETS

Spherification techniques

Recommended dosage: 0.5 - 2%. Recommended use: • Disperse Agar in the cold liquid preparation • You can facilitate dispersion with the pre-mixed Agar and a part of powdered sugar from the recipe • Bring this preparation to a boil and boil it for at least 1 minute to ensure optimum hydration and homogeneous gelation. • Pour the hot preparation into the mould and cool quickly for a fast and homogeneous gel setting.

Typical applications include: fruit paste, marmalade, fruit inserts and fillings for baked pastries.

Comments / Limitations: Agar is a material sensitive to hydrolysis. Prolonged heating of a rather acidic preparation (pH <4) could affect gel absorption during cooling. In these cases, you can try to reduce the phenomenon by reducing the acidity of the preparation using Sodium CI or simply increase the dosage of Agar. Agar is not compatible with alcoholbased preparations. Gels produced with Agar are not freeze resistant but are more or less cooking resistant. It can therefore easily be used for fruit inserts and fillings in pastry products (cake, financier, etc.) but is not recommended for frozen/deep frozen dessert fruit inserts. It also produces rather opaque gels.